MARTIN, James Edward

Known as: 
Slinger
Rank: 
Major
Unit/Base: 
Regiment/Corps: 
Pioneer Corps
Service: 
Army
Service number: 
131024
 James Edward 'Slinger' Martin Martin served as the Administrative Officer for No 3 Commando.  A veteran of the First World War serving as a Trooper with the 9th Lancers, and later post war with the 16th Lancers, attaining the rank of RSM.
 
On the 15th May 1940 the former RSM Martin was commissioned Lt (Quartermaster) in the Pioneer Corps. (Source: London Gazette Supp. 34877, page 3772.)
 
He was appointed MBE for "gallant and distinguished services in NW Europe."  (Source: London Gazettes Supp.37302, page 4994.)
 
Post war he relinquished his commission with the War Substantive rank of Captain on the 22nd September 1949 on enlistment into the TA.  (Source: London Gazettes Supp. 38805, page 101.)
 
His death was announced in Commando Association Newsletter 44 of March 1967. The following is an extract from there:
 
"We are grateful to Brigadier Peter Young, D.S.O., M.C., M.A., F.S.A., and our President, Lt.Colonel Peter Bartholomew, D.S.O., for their permission to print extracts from their joint appreciation of the late Major James Edward Martin, M.B.E., for several years a member of the Association General Committee.
 
'Slinger' Martin began his military career in the 9th Lancers. He went out to France as a very young trooper in 1915, saw a good deal of fighting, much hardship, and, though wounded, came through still bent on a military career. After the war, he greatly distinguished himself as a roughrider, and as Army Champion in the sword, Iance and pistol event at Olympia.
 
Commissioned early in the War, he joined No. 3 Commando as Administrative Officer in that first difficult winter of hope-deferred. His cheerful and efficient presence did much to dispel the prevailing gloom. Quartermasters are a strange race, so some think, but 'Slinger', as a good- cavalryman should, showed himself 'ready for anything', even change. How it fell to his lot to storm, with a couple of stouthearted storemen, a house at Vaagso, is not quite clear; but as,Lord Lovat once said  "In a Commando everyone comes under starter's orders".
 
On D-Day, 'Slinger' went in with our first flight - not many-men with 1914-18 medals up can have hit the beach at 'H'+90, and No. 3 will always recall the glorious moment when at the head of his jeep-convoy he burst through to Angoville, where the First Commando Brigade was sitting somewhat precariously in the German second line. No award gave more pleasure to his many friends than Slinger's M.B.E.  We have lost the best and truest of comrades.  All our sympathy goes out to his widow."
 

Register on our Forum and post any additional information that you may hold.
All content researched and administered by the Commando Veterans Archive www.commandoveterans.org